Finance Globe

U.S. financial and economic topics from several finance writers.
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4 Reasons to Stay At Your Job, Even When You Want to Quit

man-leaving-job-packing

We spend a lot of our time working, so if you’re not completely satisfied with your job, it’s hard to shake the idea of quitting. But, no matter how much you want to leave your job, there are some times when it’s best to stay put – at least temporarily.

You don’t have another job lined up.

It could take several weeks or even months to get a new job, especially during periods of high unemployment. If you’re single with no dependents, you might be able to weather unemployment for a few months. However, if you have a spouse or children who depend on your income, quitting without a new job lined up will affect more than just you. Think long and hard (and discuss it with your spouse), before you quit without a backup plan.

You don’t have an emergency fund.

Without a job lined up, you need a source of backup funding to cover expenses until you’re employed again. You might need an emergency fund even if you have another job. There could be delay between your last paycheck from your old job and the first check from your new job. An emergency fund will help you cover this gap.

Even if your spouse is working, going from two incomes to one can be a difficult transition. Work on downsizing your lifestyle and create an emergency fund before you quit your job.

You have unused vacation days.

Check your state law and employer’s policies before quitting with vacation time left. In some cases, your employer may have to pay off for your unused vacation. But, the opposite can happen and you lose your vacation benefits. Rather than quitting with unused vacation, you could used up your vacation first then plan your departure later. Who knows? After taking some time, you might rethink leaving your job.

You’re almost vested.

Your employer’s profit sharing or 401(k) matching contributions may not vest until you reach a certain number of years of service. If you leave your job one day sooner, you could lose out on thousands of dollars in your retirement account. Check your company’s policy before you quit so you won’t lose out on this valuable asset. You may choose to leave before you’re vested, but at least know what you’re walking away from.

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Comments 1

Frank on Tuesday, 26 September 2017 19:19

With the people I work with, I usually tell them to make sure they have 2-3 solid leads or actual offers before leaving your current job. There is too much risk, especially if you do not have a lot of savings.

With the people I work with, I usually tell them to make sure they have 2-3 solid leads or actual offers before leaving your current job. There is too much risk, especially if you do not have a lot of savings.
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Thursday, 17 October 2019

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